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May’s book club book is “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith. This month’s selection is in large print. An audiobook will also be available at the circulation desk for checkout if needed. This book, although a “classic”, is timeless. It gives a good historical look at the immigrant culture of New York in the early 1900s. While the book may seem daunting because of its status as a classic, this story lives and breathes still, like a tree growing through concrete.

“‘Brooklyn,' Francie tells her brother at the end of the novel. 'It's a magic city and it isn't real. . . . It's like -- yes -- a dream. . . . But it's like a dream of being poor and fighting.' The civilization of Smith's Williamsburg exists in very few living memories -- it will be soon a century away. In that stretch of Brooklyn and on the Lower East Side, you still find Francie's streets and tenements. And when even these isolated signposts are gone, the spirit of the book, the lives and struggles it celebrates, will be with us, reminding us of who we were and who we still are.”
--- January 3, 1999 BOOKEND / By ROBERT CORNFIELD
archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/99/01/03/bookend/bookend.html?module=inline
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May’s book club book is “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith.  This month’s selection is in large print.  An audiobook will also be available at the circulation desk for checkout if needed.  This book, although a “classic”, is timeless.  It gives a good historical look at the immigrant culture of New York in the early 1900s.  While the book may seem daunting because of its status as a classic, this story lives and breathes still, like a tree growing through concrete.

“‘Brooklyn, Francie tells her brother at the end of the novel. Its a magic city and it isnt real. . . . Its like -- yes -- a dream. . . . But its like a dream of being poor and fighting. The civilization of Smiths Williamsburg exists in very few living memories -- it will be soon a century away. In that stretch of Brooklyn and on the Lower East Side, you still find Francies streets and tenements. And when even these isolated signposts are gone, the spirit of the book, the lives and struggles it celebrates, will be with us, reminding us of who we were and who we still are.”
--- January 3, 1999  BOOKEND / By ROBERT CORNFIELD
https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/99/01/03/bookend/bookend.html?module=inline

It's Wednesday and at 1:00 it will be time for BINGO! ... See MoreSee Less

Its Wednesday and at 1:00 it will be time for BINGO!
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